Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

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Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

A commission established by the United Nations to foster economic and other cooperation among states in Asia, Oceania and the South Pacific. The United States and several European countries also participate. It was founded in 1947.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) pointed out that SARS-related factors could have a huge impact on the economies in the entire ESCAP region, notably Hong Kong, which is forecast to post 2.
According to ESCAP, "The growth slowdown (in Southeast and East Asia) is forecast to be accompanied by a pickup in inflation of 1 percentage point in 2001.
The ESCAP meeting aims to summarize the achievements of each Asia-Pacific nation and discuss further measures to improve the lives of handicapped people in the region.
The spread between the approach using vital statistics and the adjusted figure is the issue that appears to receive greatest attention in the ESCAP report.
The main correlate of development planning by government is carried out through the budgetary process and this issue of Development Papers attempts to highlight the various mechanisms of budget formulation and implementation in the developing and developed countries of the ESCAP region.
During 1985-90 period the demand for petrochemical end-products (thermoplastic) in the ESCAP developing countries including Pakistan increased from 6 per cent (1965-80) to 8 per cent annual compound growth rate.
Since June 2011 in Almaty has operated ESCAP Subregional Office for North and Central Asia.
Shamshad Akhtar, UN ESCAP Executive Secretary emphasized the need to promote quality growth and shared prosperity in the region.
At the closing, Noeleen Heyzer, UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of ESCAP, commended governments for their forward-looking agreement: "The Declaration is a new milestone and a blueprint for continued Asia-Pacific leadership, on issues of population in the next phase of development, with sustainability at its core, benefitting both our people and our planet.
Subsequently she was first secretary, High Commission of India, Accra (1985-89), counsellor, Embassy of India, Paris (1989-92), deputy chief of mission and deputy permanent representative to ESCAP at Embassy of India, Bangkok (1997-2000) and consul general, Milan (2000-04).
Established in 1947 with its headquarters in Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP works to overcome some of the region's greatest challenges by providing results oriented projects, technical assistance and capacity building to member States in the following areas:
After detailing the nature and impact of each in turn, she looks at sub-regional variations such as a mixed results in North and Central Asia, downward pressures but steadfast resilience in South and Southwest Asia, and heightened contagion and deepening recession in ESCAP countries.