EPA


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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

A regulatory body of the U.S. federal government responsible for environmental health and well-being. Its writes and enforces regulations within the parameters set up by law. It is charged with protecting water, air, land, and endangered species, as well as with the handling of hazardous waste. For example, the EPA administers legislation requiring registration of all pesticides sold in the U.S. The EPA was established in 1970.

EPA

See Environmental Protection Agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
The CDC also joined with the EPA to set up a joint task force to conduct an environmental health needs and habitability assessment to identify critical public health issues for the reinhabitation of New Orleans.
Elton Gallegly, R-Thousand Oaks, is writing a letter to EPA Administrator Mike Leavitt on the future of the agency's involvement at the Santa Susana Field Lab.
In response to its failure to finalize all the MACT rules, EPA published a rule on April 5 to establish a two-step case-by-case MACT application process, with detailed emissions information not required by industrial facilities until May 15, 2004.
EPA says that incidences of respiratory problems in children alone would decrease by one million cases a year.
For some communities, says Browner, a particular EPA library may be the "only point of access" to certain records about local environmental hazards.
The proposed rule does not require EPA be notified prior to beginning all renovation jobs, but requests comment about whether or not they should.
The EPA rule builds on the excellent progress achieved between industry and government but will require continued collaborative efforts to ensure that fuel, engines, emissions controls systems and equipment all come together to provide value to the owners and users of equipment.
The EPA '05 includes a number of provisions on hybrid and electric cars.
Wall, senior attorney with NRDC, who represents the plaintiffs, added that ``Congress told EPA to set pesticide levels for food that provide a reasonable certainty of no harm to all our children, including kids living on and near farms.
Most of those dying from respiratory and cardiac ailments triggered by soot don't just die a few hours or a day earlier than they would have otherwise; the EPA projects that the average victim has 14 years knocked off his or her life.
The American Petroleum Institute vehemently opposed EPA regulation of plant security under the Clean Air Act.