Everyday Low Pricing

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Everyday Low Pricing

A pricing strategy in which a retail store consistently carries low prices and rarely holds sales promotions in which it lowers prices temporarily. Everyday low pricing is intended to promote customer loyalty so buyers persistently shop at a store because they know prices will always be low. Everyday low pricing also means a retailer spends less in advertising. Everyday low pricing stores may have higher sales than hi-low pricing stores, but may also experience lower profits.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, EDLP is Wal-Mart's DNA and it better be the same for vendors.
Switching from PROMO to EDLP is six times more expensive than migrating the other way around -- which explains why supermarkets did not shift en masse to an "everyday low pricing" format as predicted when Walmart entered the game.
EDLP (Everyday Low Prices) and EDLC (Everyday Low Costs): Duke reiterated Walmart's unwavering commitment to the second priority, EDLP and EDLC.
The focus should not be on promotions but on EDLP and product reformulation, said Quick.
With more retailers employing an EDLP strategy, price is becoming a less effective driver of loyalty as customers now expect low prices when they go shopping.
Recent high-low to EDLP conversions-cumremerchandisings have not worked Out well in the short term for Ahold with Mel's in Long Island, N.
This year we reaffirmed our commitment to our EDLP roots with our recent investment in lowering the price of everyday essentials.
EDLP, used by discount stores such as Wal-Mart, consistently features items at low prices and seldom on sale.
Asda's EDLP proposition is the key reason for the retailer satisfying customers on this aspect more than any other featured electricals retailer for the second consecutive year.
It needs to decide if it wants to do EDLP or be a mini-supermarket that does as many deals as the big four.
Examples of this are the expansion of EDLP in Japan and our supercentre growth in Canada.