United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

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United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean

A commission established by the United Nations to foster economic and other cooperation among Central, South American and Caribbean states. Interestingly, members include North American and Western European countries as well. It was founded in 1948.
References in periodicals archive ?
On balance, said ECLAC, investment levels in Mexico for the first half of this year was similar to the average for the previous five years, not counting the atypical increase recorded in 2013.
The flagship CCTs in Latin America have in fact been widely criticized, including by ECLAC, for operating with a maternalist vision, which assumes that women should take charge of domestic life, care, and raising children.
Faced with difficult prospects on the horizon, ECLAC predicted that it will be hard for the region to achieve sustained growth, reduce poverty and economic inequality, and become more innovative without diversifying its productive and export structures.
In 2004, for example, Cuba said its economy grew 5%, while ECLAC put the number at 3%.
Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, ECLAC (1999).
The major supplier of FDI flows to Latin America during the 1990s (and historically) has been the United States followed (in order of importance) by Great Britain, Japan, Germany, and France (see ECLAC 2001).
ECLAC s Executive Secretary, Alicia BEircena, and Ecuador s National Secretary for Planning and Development, Sandra Naranjo, inaugurated the event.
To combat the deceleration in the regional economic activity, it is important to prevent the investment rate from dropping, said ECLAC.
ECLAC executive secretary Alicia Barcena said that 66 million people remain mired in extreme poverty --of whom 51% are children--and 167 million are poor, 29% of the region's population.
I am in full agreement with the ECLAC position on this.
In its annual report, "The Economics of Climate Change in Latin America and the Caribbean," ECLAC pointed to rising temperatures as one of the greatest economic threats to the region.
She explains about ISO 26000 and the efforts of ECLAC to establish the standards for social responsibility as another quality in their management scheme.