European Court of Justice

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European Court of Justice

The supreme court of the European Union. It was established in 1952, predating the foundation of the EU by several decades. It has jurisdiction over EU law, but not over the national laws of member states. It consists of one judge per member state, though the full court meets rarely and decisions are made generally by a panel of judges.

European Court of Justice

the EUROPEAN UNION court which is responsible for interpreting the laws passed by the EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT which are binding upon the citizens of member states of the European Union. The European Court often interecedes to overrule judgements made by the courts of member states or modify national laws.
References in periodicals archive ?
63) The ECJ also believed that a labeling requirement for pasta both in a retail setting and in a restaurant would be sufficient to warn Italian consumers that they may be consuming pasta that contained common wheat, and reminded the Italian government of its strong authority to require content labeling.
The two cases had gone to national courts, whose judges then sought guidance from the ECJ because the issue involved was EU-wide.
Our platform the first of its kind--collects, presents, and categorizes references for a preliminary ruling pending before the ECJ, with the possibility to leave a brief.
However, the ECJ decided, on the merits, not to uphold those actions.
The ECJ formed an integral part of the institutional architecture of the European Communities and, later, the EU.
In addition, the companies may wish to think through the implications of leaving a Safe Harbor certification in place, including based on how business practices change in response to the ECJ decision, and in light of the legal implications that certification involves under U.
The case in the ECJ also involves the suppliers of such decoder cards to those pubs.
In any case it becomes clear that there is a contradiction between the slow turning of the EU to more social rights and the outlined ECJ judgements in which market freedoms have priority over social rights.
The Advocate General's Opinion is not binding on the ECJ, who will make a ruling on the matter later this year, but the ECJ tends to follow it in 70% of the cases.
contradicts it, but the UK should now follow the ECJ decision.
The British High Court applied to the ECJ on the grounds that the final decision would affect all similar cases in the member states of the EU.
In the ECJ proceedings referred from the Greek court, Efetio Athinon, the Advocate General issued his opinion on 1st April, 2008 which favours a conclusion that GSK was abusing a dominant position in refusing supplies to the exporter wholesalers (Joined Cases C-468/06-478/06).