Treaty of Rome

(redirected from EC Treaty)

Treaty of Rome

A 1957 agreement establishing the European Economic Community. Under the Treaty, the EEC shared a parliament and Court of Justice with the European Coal and Steel Community. These organizations eventually merged and formed the basis for what became the European Union.

Treaty of Rome

an agreement signed in 1958 by the six founding countries of the European Economic Community that established the objectives and principles of the modern EUROPEAN UNION. The Treaty provided for the removal of trade restrictions between member countries, free labour and capital mobility, harmonization of tax policies and assistance to poorer regions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company referred the case to the Swedish district court, which decided partially in its favour, considering that the export prohibition as regards the EU and the EEA was contrary to Directive 93/42/EEC (Article 4) or Article 29 of the EC Treaty (prohibition of quantitative restrictions to exports).
The European Commission has concluded that a French proposal to grant tax aid to insurers for managing certain supplementary sickness insurance policies ( contrats solidaires' and contrats responsables') is not compatible with the rules on state aid in the EC Treaty.
Prior court rulings on a similar rule found that such a rule conflicts with the protection for the free movement of workers under the EC Treaty.
The Commission said the two provisions are incompatible with Article 43 of the EC Treaty, which guarantees freedom of establishment.
The European Commission announced, on 14 July, that it had decided to authorise under EC Treaty state aid rules a scheme proposed by the United Kingdom introducing a trading system for CO2 emissions.
45 billion) May 13, finding the chipmaker's practices violated EC treaty antitrust law.
Both Austria and Sweden, prior to their accession to the EC Treaty, had concluded several BITs with third countries, such as China, Vietnam, Egypt, Pakistan, Argentina, and Korea.
The text provides international tax practitioners and academics with analysis of key issues arising from the relations between European law and third countries in the area of direct taxation, including the external scope of Article 56 EC Treaty and its impact on the relations with third countries, the indirect impact of other fundamental freedoms on the relations with third countries, the scope of fundamental freedoms in relations to EEA States under the EEA Agreement, the impact of secondary EC law on relations with third States, the Article 307 EC Treaty, and the treaty-making power of the EU in relations with third States.
Article 86(1) of the EC Treaty requires member states to ensure that public undertakings and undertakings to which member states grant special or exclusive rights to comply with EC Treaty rules, including the competition rules.
More to the point, if there is any immunity under application of the free movement rule due to the "sports-specificity" of the rule, then in my opinion, the inevitable consequence is that this rules out unfair restriction of competition under Article 81, EC Treaty, as well as abuse of an economically dominant position under Article 82, EC Treaty, and that the sporting rule rather promotes competition, is efficient, and as such is entirely legitimate.
Targeted to lawyers, policymakers and academics interested in copyright law, the book evaluates the economic and legal consequences of the rise of user-generated content for existing copyright rules, with reference to human rights law, competition law and other policies contained in the EC Treaty.
This is not surprising since (a) the EC treaty and ECJ case law take precedence over domestic law, (b) extrapolation of a decision regarding one jurisdiction's law to other jurisdictions is relatively straightforward in many cases, and (c) ECJ decisions are generally made on broad principles and are not focused on the detailed provisions in question.