DES

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DES

Abbreviation for "Delivered Ex Ship."

Delivered Ex Ship

In international commerce, an agreement between a buyer and a seller in which the seller must bear all costs and risks of transporting a good until it has arrived at a port and has been made available for the buyer or his/her agent to retrieve it. That is, the seller has total responsibility while the good is being shipped overseas. The seller must pay the shipping company and purchase insurance for the good. See also: Incoterm.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have had patients with the problem of restenosis asking when they can get a drug-eluting stent.
Many animal studies also have shown that the benefit of drug-eluting stents disappears soon after the drug itself disappears.
The Company believes it is poised to take advantage of the drug-eluting stent opportunity for a variety of reasons, including its more than five years of scientifically rigorous research and development, the compelling clinical results of its TAXUS program, the combined strength of the components of its technology, its overall market leadership, and the largest sales force in interventional cardiology.
The safety and efficacy results achieved with the Endeavor drug-eluting stent are impressive and likely driven by key design elements aimed at the healing phase, by combining optimum choices of stent platform, polymer and drug," said Medtronic Sr.
the ENDEAVOR II randomized, controlled trial comparing the performance of the Endeavor drug-eluting stent to the Medtronic Driver[R] bare metal stent
MIVT is developing its proprietary hydroxyapatite (HAp)-based drug-eluting stents to provide significant advantages in biocompatibility that are expected to lead to improved long term patient-health outcomes, compared with existing polymer-based drug-eluting stents.
Among patients without diabetes, drug-eluting stents would be cost effective when lesions occur in coronary vessels up to 2.
Drug-eluting stents have become the gold standard in PCI procedures; it is up for debate as to whether biodegradable stents become the future gold standard.
Given that drug-eluting stents cut target-vessel restenosis rates by about 80%, they will save money if they're used in patients with a restenosis rate of 18% or greater, and drug-eluting stents will meet accepted definitions of cost effectiveness (costing less than $10,000 for each repeat revascularization prevented) for all patients with a bare-metal stent restenosis rate of 12% or greater.
From the time drug-eluting stents were introduced, physicians were concerned about an increased incidence of late thrombosis.
Stone's assessment last November, there are "pretty good grounds" for using a single drug-eluting stent to treat in-stent restenosis within a bare metal stent.
When all of these cost-adding and cost-saving numbers are crunched together, you come up with an estimate indicating that placement of a drug-eluting stent adds no incremental cost when used in patients with an expected restenosis rate with bare-metal stents of at least 10%, he said.