Double Dip Recession

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Double Dip Recession

A long-term macroeconomic trend characterized by a recession, a recovery, then another recession. For example, the United States economy entered a recession in 1929, which continued until 1933. Recovery continued until 1937, at which point a second recession began. Double-dip recessions often have weak recoveries in between the recessions (though the example above included some years of very strong growth); analysts therefore tend to worry about a double-dip recession when a recovery is weak.
References in periodicals archive ?
Double-dip recessions, also called "W shaped" recessions, are painful to investors as they get burned on the way down and then burned again on the temporary recovery.
On Thursday, Britain's Office for National Statistics did just that, now saying the country did not experience a double-dip recession in the first months of last year.
A double-dip recession is when a country's economy contracts, then returns to positive growth for a short period of time, then falls back into recession.