Donor

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Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
We have had strong donor designation for a number of years, which results directly in more lives saved and healed thanks to the generosity of Colorado and Wyoming donors and their families.
Nonprofits, both large and small, lose roughly a third of their donors annually.
Unfortunately, few egg donors are currently available in the UK because of legal restrictions on anonymity and compensation.
Olson believes that the generosity of donors is being abused on an "epic scale" by tissue procurement organizations, middlemen, and biotech companies that depend on tissue for their survival.
Therefore, if donors wish to defer the receipt of trust payments to later years when other sources of income available to them might be less, or when they might be in a lower tax bracket, the trust assets could be invested for growth in the early years rather than for income.
The new DMV process brings us a 700 percent increase in potential donors, which is tremendously good news to the 18,000 Californians -- 92,000 people nationwide -- now waiting for a second chance.
Contrasting the yields on those receiving scholarships with those not funded can help donors see the impact of financial aid on enrollment behavior.
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has ordered the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) to begin developing policies mirroring those that govern deceased donors and deceased organ recipients.
Information should include cost-per-dollar raised, goal versus realized revenue, number of donors, new donor acquisition, donor retention, repeat donors, average gift, payment method, year-over-year comparison, among others.
Within 10 years, nearly two-thirds of kidneys transplanted from brain-dead donors or cadavers fail, defined as a decline in blood-filtering capacity to a point at which the person needs dialysis.
If the breach involves any loaned works, they must be returned to the donors.
The increased number of patients with advanced liver disease requiring transplantation has resulted in the expansion of selection criteria for potential donors.