Donor


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Related to Donor: organ donor, Donor atom, Sperm donor

Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the increase in tissue donors, Donor Alliance, which educates about organ and tissue donation and manages the recovery of tissue and organs, facilitated organ recoveries from 109 donors in 2014 helping save 337 lives across the country.
The single biggest determinant of donor loyalty is the quality of service the donor receives from the fundraising staff.
At 40, her chances of becoming pregnant with her own eggs drop to about 5%, but with donor eggs, her chance of pregnancy skyrockets to more than 60% per cycle.
Hospitals, hospices, and nursing homes have agreements with tissue procurement organizations, inviting them to contact the next of kin as a potential donor nears death.
A variation of the CRUT, called a net income CRUT, pays the donor the lesser of the net income of the trust or the unitrust amount.
509): The donor funds the charity and sets the charitable purpose.
As of (Monday), we've had 300,000 more people sign up on the donor registry.
Contrasting the yields on those receiving scholarships with those not funded can help donors see the impact of financial aid on enrollment behavior.
The decision to direct the OPTN to develop the new policies was made by HRSA after reviewing responses from transplant organizations, individuals and living donors and live donor families responding to a request for comments on the subject published in the Jan.
Results of the audit information survey distributed to all four agencies "suggests that basic information about their databases, fundraising results, prospect and donor pools, cost-per-dollar raised, etc.
Within 10 years, nearly two-thirds of kidneys transplanted from brain-dead donors or cadavers fail, defined as a decline in blood-filtering capacity to a point at which the person needs dialysis.
Pathologic examination of the explanted donor liver demonstrated focal acute subcapsular necrosis, large droplet fat accumulation, and mild chronic portal inflammation.