Donor


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Related to Donor: organ donor, Donor atom, Sperm donor

Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
Blood donor eligibility is determined by medical interviews, based on the guidelines set on a National level for donor selection.
Saudi studies about donor deferral rates, deferred donor characteristics and reasons for deferral are scarce.
This can be strengthened by developing a greater understanding of the donor's interests and values and demonstrating that the donor and the organization share key values and a vision of "what could be.
A 2001 report from the Department of Health and Human Services found that "tissue banking and processing practices have gradually diverged from donor families' expectations.
If a trustee has been investing for growth to defer income, this rule could severely limit the amount of income the donor would be able to receive from the trust.
Establishment of a donor-advised fund at a community foundation or financial institution: The donor gets an immediate tax deduction at FMV.
Also, the expanded donor registry means the 18,000 Californians awaiting an organ donation have a much better chance at getting one than Rosenbloom did only five years ago.
The majority of respondents indicated that OPTN living donor guidelines should be given the same status of other OPTN policies," HRSA said in the Federal Register notice.
Information should include cost-per-dollar raised, goal versus realized revenue, number of donors, new donor acquisition, donor retention, repeat donors, average gift, payment method, year-over-year comparison, among others.
That same percentage failed among untested kidneys obtained from donors under age 60.
However, bacterial antigens, endotoxin, and cytokines could potentially be sequestered in a donor liver, especially when organ transplantation occurs within days of the bacteremic episode.