DOMA

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DOMA

A category of customer loyalty in which customers do not switch to a competitor unless they, as the abbreviation states, die or move away.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aggregate and Industry Level TFP in the Framework of the Domar Decomposition
Psychological uncertainty (of conception) and the perceived lack of control over their own physicality, in addition to cultural expectations for women to bear children, is justifiably distressing (Cousineau & Domar, 2007; Peloquin & Lafontaine, 2010).
Es entonces necesario releer a las mujeres poderosas de la novela como partes de una economia que, si bien existe solo temporalmente y acaba siendo relevada por la economia politica general dominada por los hombres, es la figura (en tanto hecho que solo se comprendera cuando lo complete un hecho ulterior) de lo que el melodrama intenta domar infructuosamente.
This requirement rules out the Leontief technology assumed in the classical contributions by Harrod (1939) and Domar (1946).
The dominant one-sector macro models of the day, from Keynesian to Harrod-Domar [see Harrod (1939) and Domar (1957)] to Solow 1956, seemed to have relatively little relevance for developing societies like Pakistan.
The classic theoretical framework for analyzing economic growth in developing countries is the Harrod and Domar growth model and the Solow model.
In sum, both the size and composition of public debt matter, as pointed out by Domar more than half century ago.
The intersection of stress and fertility is a controversial one, but we do know that stress can reduce the probability of conception," said Alice Domar, principal investigator, OB/GYN, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Executive Director of the Domar Center for Mind/Body Health at Boston IVF.
Domar AD, Meshay I, Kelliher J, Alper M, Powers RD.
This literature shows that use of ART is associated with stress (Domar, 2004; Peterson, Newton, & Feingold, 2007), sense of personal failure regarding fertility (Cousineau & Domar, 2007), depression (Fassino, Piero, Boggio, Piccioni, & Garzaro, 2002), and anxiety (Dhaliwal, Gupta, Gopalan, & Kulhara, 2004; Fassino et al.
21) Evsey Domar, "On the Measurement of Technological Change," Economic Journal, vol.