Djeser

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Djeser

An ancient Egyptian unit of length approximately equivalent to 30 centimeters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Egypt is doing some housekeeping at its oldest pyramid - replacing stones and cleaning the Djoser Step Pyramid in an effort to restore the site.
Nearing Saqqara, less than 20 miles southwest of Cairo and a short ride from Giza, dense groves of date palms suddenly give way to endless desert and the early step pyramid built for King Djoser, who died in 2648 B.
It's home to the stunning 4,700-year-old step pyramid of Djoser, which will also open late this summer for interior tours.
The Pyramid of Djoser at the site at Saqqara, south west of Cairo, was at risk of collapse after an earthquake in 1992, reports the BBC.
Others go back much earlier, such as the temple platforms of Mesopotamia from the fifth to the fourth millennia BC, followed by the ziggurats of the third millennium, or the first pyramids in Egypt, the earliest of which is the Step Pyramid of Djoser at Saqqara (after 2686 BC, the start of the Third Dynasty) (summarised in Whittle 1997a: 143-4; with references).
Those students were charged with designing a scholar's center, including furniture for the funerary complex of King Djoser at Saqqara, Egypt, circa 2650 B.
The tombs lie just west of Saqqara's most famed pyramid, the Step Pyramid of King Djoser, which is surrounded by a large burial ground, containing tombs from Egypt's earliest history up through Roman times.
The new data showed the reign of Djoser, the best known pharaoh in the Old Kingdom, was between 2691 and 2625 BCE, some 50 to 100 years earlier than the established wisdom.
He named Imhotep (2650 BC), the chief minister and royal physician to Pharaoh Djoser (2686-2613 BC).
Djoser employed the multi-genius Imhotep to build the Funerary Complex in Saqqara that still pulls in crowds 2,500 years after it was built.
It claims that the Near Eastern civilizations arose at the same times as those of China and the New World in the wake of Noah's Flood at around 3300 BC and that famed Egyptian chancellor to the Pharoah Djoser, Imhotep, was in fact one and the same as the biblical Joseph, son of Jacob, among other novel arguments.