Divisor

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Divisor

Used in construction of stock indices. Suppose there 10 stocks in an index, each worth $10 and the index is at 100. Now suppose that one of the stocks must be replaced with another stock that is worth $20. If no adjustment is made to the divisor, the total value of the index would be110 after the swapping. yet there should be no increase in value because nothing has happened other than switching the two constituents. The solution is to change the divisor; in this case from 1.00 to 1.10. Note that the value of the index, 110/1.1, is now exactly 100 - which is where it was prior to the swap.

Divisor

In division, the number by which another number if divided. For example, in the equation 8 / 4 = 2, the divisor is 4. This is used in indexes to account for stock splits and dividends. See also: Dow divisor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let B is Boolean-near-ring whose proper subset having a non-zero divisor of associate ring A.
The group of principal divisors is defined as the image of the Laplacian operator and is denoted by Prin(G).
Figure 4: The first seven members of the aliquot sequence of 30: sum of proper integer proper divisors divisors 30 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 15 42 42 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 14, 21 54 54 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 18, 27 66 66 1, 2, 3, 6, 11, 22, 33 78 78 1, 2, 3, 6, 13, 26, 39 90 90 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 18, 30, 144 45 144 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 16, 18, 259 24, 36, 48, 72
2] = [summation over (d|n)] 1, the number of positive divisors of n, from [[mu].
for a given divisor [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and a positive integer m [greater than or equal to] 1, which is denoted as mD.
We use the Belgian mathematician Victor d'Hondt's divisor system - 1,2,3 etc.
and for the purpose of this proof, we set S(N) to be the sum of all the divisors of N, including N itself.
The HPPLL offers superior output frequency granularity and 50% duty cycle for both even and odd output divisors at lower power consumption.
WU, Problem of exponential divisors and exponentially square-free integers, J.
So if g is the greatest common divisor of the [[alpha].
For example, N = 6 is perfect, because the (relevant) divisors are 1, 2 and 3, and 6 = 1 + 2 + 3.
In Schuh's game, two players agree on a large number, then make a list of all the divisors of the number, including the number itself but excluding 1.