Divini Redemptoris


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Divini Redemptoris

An encyclical letter written by Pope Pius XI in 1937. The letter is primarily a condemnation of communism, which Pius XI believed to be antithetical to the common good. It forms part of modern Catholic social justice theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Divini redemptoris, Plus XI called Communism "a satanic scourge" (No.
Pius XI later confirmed this interpretation of social justice in another encyclical, Divini Redemptoris, when he writes: "Now it is of the very essence of social justice to demand for each individual all that is necessary for the common good.
Pius XI had also condemned communism, in the Encyclical Divini Redemptoris.
For an example of papal statements condemning communism, see Pope Paul XI, Divini Redemptoris, March 1937.
Pius XI attacked communism in his encyclical Divini Redemptoris and Nazism in Mit Brennender Sorge, both in 1937.
The catechism departs from an essentially scriptural exegesis on the Second Coming to cite Pope Plus XI's 1937 encyclical Divini redemptoris rejecting the idea that messianic hope can be made "within history," stating that it can only be made "beyond history through the eschatological judgment.
Like the collapsed Soviet Union, the New Labour government is just another manifestation of the diabolical ideology described in 1937 by Pope Pius XI in his encyclical Divini Redemptoris on atheistic communism which always and everywhere seeks to upset the social order and undermine the very foundations of Christian civilization.
Pius XII finally officially introduced this concept into Roman Catholic social doctrine with Quadragesimo Anno (May 15, 1931) and Divini Redemptoris (March 19, 1937).
In the first instance, Pope Pius XI in his 1937 encyclical Divini redemptoris demonstrates the connection between social justice and the common good.
It is to put the State in the place of God; hence, as Pius XI declared in 1937 in Divini redemptoris, communism is inherently atheistic.
Hayek criticized the encyclicals, Quadragesimo Anno (1931) and Divini Redemptoris (1937), of Pope Pius XI for having "made the aim of 'social justice' part of its official doctrine" (Ibid.