disk drive

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disk drive

a mechanical device in a COMPUTER which records and retrieves data from a rotating magnetic or vinyl disk.
References in periodicals archive ?
5" SAS disk drive technology will provide customers with the ultimate in performance and reliability for their IT server environments.
As the industry moves to larger capacity, lower cost SATA hard disk drives, companies are increasingly exposed to frequent hard disk drive failures and the potential loss of huge amounts of data," Licosati explained.
IDEMA, the International Trade Association for the $30 Billion Hard Disk Drive Industry, Appoints New Director to Asia Pacific Board
By 2010 we expect that close to 40% of total shipped hard disk drives will be used in consumer applications, up from about 14% in 2004
5" disk drives in Q4 2005 and, ultimately, will be capable of producing disk drives of varying form factors, giving Hitachi GST the flexibility required to meet future demand in the traditional IT and consumer segments.
IDEMA, the International Disk Drive, Equipment and Materials Association, hosted its annual DISKCON USA conference on September 13 and 14 which featured industry leaders who discussed the latest trends, next generation technologies and the ever changing hard disk drive market.
Tape cartridge capacities are also growing at unprecedented rates but are not faced with the super-paramagnetic effect like disk drives.
Also available in a 40GB capacity (MK4025GAS), Toshiba's latest hard disk drives accommodate the storage needs of multi-functional mobile PCs and other applications, such as telecommunications, printers, copiers, GPS systems and MP3 players.
These are affordably priced hard disk drives that expand the storage capabilities for large amounts of music, data, pictures, or video-clips.
In the past decade, the data density for magnetic hard disk drives has increased at a phenomenal pace: doubling every 18 months and, since 1997, doubling every year, which is much faster than the vaunted Moore's Law for integrated circuits.