Discouraged Worker


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Discouraged Worker

A person in the labor force who is not actively looking for work or who has been unable to find a job for an extended period of time. Discouraged workers are considered "marginally attached" to the labor force. Somewhat controversially, discouraged workers are generally not included in official estimations of unemployment.
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Both of these groups have been excluded from the discouraged worker count for comparability with U.
When you stop looking for work, you become a discouraged worker and you are no longer counted as unemployed," Rooney said.
This policy discussion is clouded somewhat by its definition of a discouraged worker.
No one talks about the discouraged worker anymore, those job hunters who simply gave up in past recessions because there was no work to be found.
An appendix to this articleprovides further information on the discouraged worker comparison between the United States and Japan.
The United States does not specifically apply an availability criterion to its discouraged worker definition.
0 million in 1994--the so-called "hidden unemployed," at least as measured through the new discouraged worker concept, were a relatively small group.
Considerable tightening of the requirements for discouraged worker status reduced the number of persons so classified by about half.
This group might be considered a kind of 'partly discouraged worker,' analogous to the usual category we might call 'fully discouraged.
A discouraged worker is one who has given up the job search because of perceived poor prospects--that is, the chance of getting a job is not worth the effort one would have to exert to find it.
These are the discouraged worker phenomenon, the use of inventories
This result is referred to as the discouraged worker effect.