Disability

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Related to Disabilites: Learning disabilities

Disability

1. Any brokerage account with a restriction, or the restrictions themselves. Disabilities exist generally to prevent conflicts of interest in investment. For example, an employee of the brokerage may be unable to make certain transactions on his account with the brokerage.

2. See: Disability insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, "[T]here is considerable evidence that non-LD pupils would benefit from higher levels of educational inputs, and even stronger evidence that as a group, if not in each individual case, those diagnosed with LDs have been remarkably unresponsive to the costly special education that has been provided to them," write Mark Kelman and Gillian Lester in their 1998 book, Jumping the Queue: An Inquiry into the Legal Treatment of Students with Learning Disabilites.
Barnes, Learning Disabilities: From Identification to Intervention is an evidence-based presentation of cutting-edge information about assessing and dealing with learning disabilities, with especial focus upon reading disabilities (word recognition, fluency, or comprehension-related), mathematics disabilities, and written expression disabilites.
8--Statewide Career Fair for College Students With Disabilites
Teachers' attitudes toward their included students with disabilites.
Disabilites set in 16 years later for the joggers in the 20-year study of 440 people by the University of California.
2008) A professional training programme to address sleep difficulties in children with disabilites.
o Identify barriers to gender-based violence survivors with disabilites in accessing multi-disciplinary mechanism services and in obtaining by these authorities the protection they need and are entitled to.
Speaking at the campaign launch in Dublin, Minister for Education Noel Dempsey, said: "We want children and adults to have a more positive approach to disabilites.
Rehabilitation professionals, as well as employers, need such information to help control costs and to facilitate retention of the growing population of individuals with disabilites who want to remain productive.
Vocational rehabilitation counselors need to become more knowledgeable about supported empoloyment and more responsive to people with severe disabilites by: (a) presuming that people with severe disabilities are employable and that the responsibility for integrated employment rests with those who are trained and paid to make community employment a reality; (b) imposing a freeze on referrals to sheltered services; (c) supporting the use of functional, ecological evaluation strategies instead of traditional tools and techniques; and, (b) increasing efforts to place individuals considered transitional employment candidates who are currently being served under the guise of supported empoloyment.