diffusion

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diffusion

the process whereby INNOVATIONS are accepted and used by firms and consumers through imitation, licensing agreements or sale of products and patents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Levi-Strauss's early commitment to diffusionism was followed by a rejection of it, which identified diffusionism with history.
Blaut, The Colonizer's Model of the World: Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric History (New York: Guilford Press, 1993); and idem, Eight Eurocentric Historians (New York: Guilford Press, 2000).
Rolt suggested that many boatpeople had Romani origins; this partly reflected Massingham's endorsement of the (discredited) ideas of diffusionism, which saw human culture as diffused from origins in Egyptian agriculture, with travelling people like the Romani acting as a direct mediating force.
In addition, study of change has been a major domain of research for the anthropologists who attempted to describe change from various theoretical standpoints like evolutionism, diffusionism, neo-evolutionism, socio-biology and many others.
In Franco Moretti's evolutionary model of worldwide genre diffusionism, translation is only mentioned in relation to specific rewriting patterns of Western novels during late-nineteenth century Japan, as if translation were a non-functional item of the whole world literary system (63n24).
In other, perhaps Deleuzian, words, Dimock proposes world literature as a rhizomatic set of flows that interact in more complex nodes and topographies than those presented in the Wallersteinian diffusionism underlying other theories of "world literature.
In our view this is a completely utilitarian technology which could, and almost certainly did develop spontaneously and independently across the globe at the very beginning of the first metal working period(s); a product of environmental determinism rather than diffusionism.
Decolonizing the mind involves a rejection of diffusionism, the notion that knowledge spreads one way from ancient Egypt to Greece and Rome, then Europe, and from there to the rest of the world.
Diffusionism and the contemporary mythology of mutants are interpreted by the Kuhn-Feyerabend-Eliade-Culianu-Duerr grid; Structuralism also benefits from a brief but very critical presentation analyzed from Mircea Eliade's and Ioan Petru Culianu's perspective (both the British branch, with its representatives, A.