developing country

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Less Developed Country

A country with lower GDP relative to other countries. Less developed countries are characterized by little industry and sometimes a comparatively high dependence on foreign aid. Less developed countries often undertake programs of development, with greater or lesser interventions on the part of the national governments. They are major borrowers from organizations such as the World Bank. While no strict definition of which countries are less developed exists, most countries that do not belong to the OECD are considered less developed. See also: International development.

developing country

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less developed country

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underdeveloped country

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emerging country

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Third World

country a country characterized by low levels of GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT and INCOME PER HEAD. See Fig. 51 . Such countries are typically dominated by a large PRIMARY SECTOR thatproduces a limited range of agricultural and mineral products and in which the majority of the POPULATION exists at or near subsistence levels, producing barely enough for their immediate needs, thus being unable to release the resources required to support a large urbanized industrial population. The term ‘developing’ indicates that, as seen by most such countries, the way to improve their economic fortunes is to diversify the industrial base of the economy by, in particular, establishing new manufacturing industries and by adopting the PRICE SYSTEM. To facilitate an increase in urban population necessary for INDUSTRIALIZATION, a nation may either IMPORT the necessary commodities from abroad with the FOREIGN EXCHANGE earned from the EXPORT of the (predominantly) primary goods, or it can attempt to improve its own agriculture. With appropriate ECONOMIC AID from industrialized countries and the ability and willingness on the part of a developing country, the transition into a NEWLY INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRY could be made.

Certain problems do exist, however. For instance, increases in real income that are achieved need to be maintained, which means keeping population numbers in check. Illiteracy and social customs for large families tend to work against governmental efforts to increase the STANDARD OF LIVING of its citizens. Also, most of the foreign exchange earned by such countries is by exporting, mainly commodities (see INTERNATIONAL TRADE). See ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE OF INDUSTRY, DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION, POPULATION TRAP, INTERNATIONAL COMMODITY AGREEMENTS, UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT, INTERNATIONAL DEBT.

References in periodicals archive ?
These two features limit the module's practicality as a teaching device for health professionals in the developing world.
From there, Singer argues not for the wild global redistribution schemes suggested by his previous writings but for big increases in foreign aid and the lowering of Western trade barriers so that developing world nations can expand their economies by selling to well-off nations which can afford to buy.
How can biotech and pharmaceutical companies achieve a balance between competing needs for drugs for the developing world while satisfying shareholders?
Even the worst effects of disasters like the tsunami could be mitigated if more resources flowed into the developing world.
But there's no good reason to expect the developing world to copy that flawed model.
Moreover, the availability of these new medications and diagnostic tests has not transferred to the developing world, where the vast majority of people with HIV live.
Starting up halon banking systems is certainly in the best interest of developing world airlines.
Washington, July 4 (ANI): Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine say that the hair sheep, a less-hirsute version of the familiar woolly barnyard resident, may be key to better diagnostic tests in developing world.
Over the long 130-year period from 1820 to 1980, developing world inequality increased (consumption inequality peaks in 1980); only in the last twenty years has it shown some decline.
Our collaboration with the CVDW is about using vision correction to improve the quality of life of young people in the developing world.
Held in Istanbul in late March, the conference sought to address the so-called "digital divide," the span between the extensive technological integration of the developed world and the deficient technological infrastructure of the developing world.

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