Despotism


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Related to Despotism: Oriental despotism

Despotism

1. A theory that the best form of government is rule by one person (or group) who knows best how people ought to live. Most governments now are democracies (at least officially) and so despotism has been more or less discredited as a theory.

2. A despotic state or government.
References in periodicals archive ?
And whether the issue concerns services or individuals, their despotism is most likely connected to the nature of the Baath Party and its supporters.
Today, she and the creators of Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib, the symbols of war on Iraq and Afghanistan, the supporters of despotism and corruption, shamelessly claim that they supported "the spread of democracy in the Arab world.
Despotism creeps back, in a gentler, but no less liberty-destroying, guise: thus the "logic of liberty" is replaced by "democracy's drift.
Unfortunately the current republic is plagued with despotism and elections have become meaningless," Karoubi, a moderate cleric and former parliament speaker, said in comments to a group of students carried on his website on Tuesday.
Aristide faced accusations of corruption and despotism when he was forced from power in Feb.
Colin Robertson's review of Matthew Lange's recent book, Lineages of Despotism and Development, takes issue with the rather reasonable view that the illiberal character of every imperial adventure is always unwelcome to those who are colonized.
If this momentum continues, there is a risk of one-party despotism.
The concept of impossible alternatives played a part in the romantic poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley, who wrote: "The rich have become richer and the poor have become poorer; and the vessel of the state is driven between the Scylla and Charybdis of anarchy and despotism.
Maybe ordinary Iranians, hearing of Saddam's sticky end, decided they were no longer willing to bow their heads to home-grown despotism.
Some people labeled the cartoon "radical," but Anderson notes in the book's introduction: "I disagree; there's nothing radical about being against torture or despotism.
Oriental despotism justified America's sense of moral superiority--its manifest, or not-so-manifest, destiny--over the barbarians.
Which of these means a state of lawlessness: anarchy, despotism or oligarchy?