Desk Jockey

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Desk Jockey

A slang term for an office worker. Examples of desk jockeys include insurance adjusters and tax preparers.
References in periodicals archive ?
In-work and out-of-work benefits have been completely frozen; the disabled are routinely robbed of vital monetary support and the unemployed made to starve whilst government desk jockeys decide how many Christmas benefit sanctions to dish out.
In-work and out-of-work benefits have been completely frozen; the disabled are routinely robbed of vital monetary support; and the unemployed are made to starve while Government desk jockeys decide how many Christmas benefit sanctions to dish out.
He and his staff, desk jockeys all, broke Japanese code in time to alert US naval forces to the coming June 1942 attack on the mid-Pacific's Midway Atoll.
To be fair though, he was referring mostly to the plethora of desk jockeys working in Ottawa, and he was also playing the good soldier carrying out an order to provide advice on how to best handle upcoming budget cuts.
But desk jockeys needn't worry - nobody is asking them to man the barricades.
While the current inability to stream elementary MP4 files might be solved soon, don't underestimate the need to serve content in emerging formats, which drives additional needs for transcoding primary content for road warriors and desk jockeys alike.
In a world without smartphones, Facebook remains mostly a PC browserbased service, a kind of diary for desk jockeys.
But British Airways desk jockeys could not be moved and insisted Fozzie would not be permitted to fly without prior arrangement.
Simply standing "is the single healthiest change most desk jockeys can make," Benden says.
But it baffles me why we have become lunch-hour desk jockeys.
While desk jockeys struggle to diversify their skills in a time of employment uncertainty, freelancers depend on diversity to stay in business--which may be their competitive advantage.
Even the less significant characters are well devised, whether the passengers on the train - grumpy, self-centered Americans, or the military staff, bent-over desk jockeys.