Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

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Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Also called DEFRA. A department of the British government responsible for regulation of agriculture and fishing, enforcement of safety standards in food, and protection of the environment. It was established in 2001 as part of a merger of previously existing departments and offices.

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)

the UK government department responsible for administering government policies in the areas of environmental protection and ‘green issues’ (see POLLUTION), the countryside, and agriculture, food and fisheries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Defra, for example, plays a key role in our ability to respond to animal disease outbreaks.
Announcing the project, Defra said that it would allow UK farmers to use cutting-edge techniques to boost effi-ciency and productivity, and allow better monitoring and management of environmental risks.
Defra says action is needed to tackle bovine TB but groups against the cull say it will have no impact and could lead to local populations of badgers being wiped out.
Last month, Defra also had to admit that 30 British egg producers had failed to comply with the ban on battery cages, which came into force on 1 January.
The new DEFRA guidance states that a "best before" date should still be carried on most foods, including canned and dry goods, jams, pickles and snacks, to indicate when they are no longer at their best but are still safe to eat.
But after Defra responded, an executive group considered the potential consequences of initiating legal proceedings.
will also analyse and present options to Defra in several other areas - for
The disease was detected during post-import testing carried out by Defra on bluetongue susceptible animals arriving from abroad.
Defra is providing a further 1m [pounds sterling] per year for two years from 2006/7 to Food from Britain, the non-departmental body responsible for promoting regional food and drink in England and overseas.
The 'Whole Farm Approach' is being developed by Defra (the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) to go live in 2006 and the first phase includes a web portal and farm appraisal self-assessment package.
According to Defra, food transport produced approximately 19 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) in 2002, accounting for approximately 1.
Keith Roberts of Defra said: "Our role at each of the clinic will be to provide farmers and growers with the necessary information to respond to the increasing demand for home grown organic food.