deficit

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Related to Deficits: Budget deficits, Trade deficits

Deficit

An excess of liabilities over assets, of losses over profits, or of expenditure over income.

Deficit

A situation in which outflow of money exceeds inflow. That is, a deficit occurs when a government, company, or individual spends more than he/she/it receives in a given period of time, usually a year. One's deficit adds to one's debt, and, therefore, many analysts believe that deficits are unsustainable over the long-term. See also: Surplus.

deficit

1. A negative retained earnings balance. A deficit results when the accumulated losses and dividend payments of a business exceed its earnings.

deficit

see BUDGET DEFICIT, BALANCE OF PAYMENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
This level of trade deficit is unsustainable and is not seen in any neighbouring country in the region.
The Commission concluded that on the basis of currently available information Cyprus, Finland, Bulgaria and Denmark have taken action representing adequate progress toward the correction of the excessive deficit," it said in a statement.
Pakistan has been facing a major problem of high trade deficit for several years.
But the savings glut is an independent driver of low global rates, and because the United States tends to have a very interest-elastic response to low interest rates due to the housing sector, it's not surprising that our current account deficit has grown over this time.
While it is obviously better to have a somewhat smaller deficit than expected, the bar has been set mighty low to call this a brilliant success.
If visual spatial deficits are hypothesized to be primary, the following strategies may prove helpful:
Myth #2: The deficit is manageable because it is heading in the right direction.
To make matters worse, our children will wake up in 2014 wondering where the money went when they get the bill for the federal deficit and the unfunded gap in Social Security benefits.
In fiscal 2002, the nation's governors dosed a collective $37 billion deficit by raising taxes by $9.
This budget snows that the issue of deficits is bogus.
The popular thinking on trade deficits is simple, appealing--and wrong
Thus, we cannot rule out the possibility that the forces behind last year's tax surge will prove transitory and dissipate more rapidly than the CBO has assumed, implying lower receipts and renewed deficits for the years ahead.