false advertising

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false advertising

Advertising that contains blatantly false or misleading statements, whether intentional or not.False advertising may be grounds for rescission,or cancellation,of a contract,and it may also provide the basis for an award of compensatory and punitive damages.

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The fMRI images allowed researchers to determine how consumers' brains respond to potentially deceptive advertising.
The FMA has decided Meinl Bank is guilty of market manipulation and misleading clients with deceptive advertising.
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring Bayer to correct deceptive advertising practices for Yaz, the best-selling oral contraception pill in the U.
Although we appreciate the drug companies' willingness to change some of their business practices, they have not agreed to all of our requests, which would protect consumers from misleading and deceptive advertising," says Bart Stupak, D-Michigan, who chairs the subcommittee.
3 Engage only in advertising that fully complies with the rules of the jurisdictions in which the member is admitted or where the advertising is placed, and not engage in any form of false, misleading, or deceptive advertising.
Chapter topics include the use of fear appeals, intrusive advertising in daily lives, the American materialistic culture, body image advertising, and puffery and deceptive advertising practice.
The measure would crack down on deceptive advertising, give homeowners a last-minute opportunity to avoid a foreclosure auction and require borrowers to educate themselves to risks.
More information on this type of deceptive advertising is available from the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Web site, hud.
The Federal Trade Commission sued the Seattle-based company, four related entities and owners Ian Eisenberg and Chris Hebard for deceptive advertising.
McNeil Nutritionals, manufacturers of the non-nutritive sweetener Splenda, is being sued by a wide range of companies and organizations for what the plaintiffs say is deceptive advertising.
Based on the aforementioned theoretical constructs, we put forth the following goals: (1) To provide a judgment-free space for second graders to discuss their opinions, emotions, experiences, pleasures and frustrations with various media; (2) To introduce students to concepts pertaining to mass media, including (but not limited to): media, commercial, deceptive advertising, consequences, etc.
At last one of these giant media conglomerates has taken a stand against deceptive advertising.