Debt-to-GDP Ratio


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Debt-to-GDP Ratio

A ratio of a country's national debt to its GDP. The debt-to-GDP ratio is one way to estimate whether or not a country will be able to repay its debt. The higher the ratio is, the more likely a country is to default because its government has borrowed too much relative to the ability of the country as a whole to repay. This may affect the country's sovereign credit rating. However, this ratio is not the only metric used. For example, the United States and the United Kingdom maintain national debts that approach 100% of GDP, but both have AAA credit ratings because the political risk in both countries is very low.
References in periodicals archive ?
From a high of nearly 75 percent in 2004, the debt-to-GDP ratio was drastically reduced to below 45 percent, owing to prudent debt management, fiscal discipline, and economic growth,' the DOF noted.
The national government debt-to-GDP ratio is adjudged to be stable as at end-2017 at 42.
Fiscal consolidation efforts in Pakistan suffered a setback last year, limiting progress on reducing the elevated public debt-to-GDP ratio.
ISLAMABAD -- Government debt-to-GDP ratio witnessed an increase of 1.
Yet, the debt is expected to swell further this year, with the 2017 Budget Review and Outlook (BROP) report released in September last year indicating that Kenya's debt-to-GDP ratio is expected to rise to 59 per cent in 2018/2019, up from the current 57 per cent, due to upcoming infrastructure projects and an expected drop in revenue collection due to a myriad of microeconomics experienced in the country last year.
The measures are part of a larger drive to bring debt-to-GDP ratio to below 80 percent in the medium term.
Greece posted last year the highest debt-to-GDP ratio with 180.
9 million, while the central government guaranteed debt-to-GDP ratio amounts to 0.
The debt-to-GDP ratio actually indicates a country's ability to pay back its debt.
Though China's overall debt-to-GDP ratio is not an outlier among emerging-market economies, and its levels of household and government debt are moderate, its corporate debt-to-GDP ratio, at 170%, is the highest in the world, twice as large as that of the United States.
Considering net debt financing in 2018-2020, debt-to-GDP ratio is expected to decrease to 22.
Summary: Improved tax collection and economic diversification will be essential to stop Nigeria's debt-to-GDP ratio rising.