Debt capacity

Debt capacity

Ability to borrow. The amount a firm can borrow up to the point where the firm value no longer increases.

Debt Capacity

1. See: Debt ceiling.

2. The amount of debt that a person or company can repay in a reasonable amount of time using current resources and assuming income neither increases nor decreases. See also: Creditworthiness.
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Today's issuance is in line with Fitch's expectation that Charter will continue to issue debt using additional debt capacity created primarily through EBITDA growth.
Investment bank and wealth management firm HJ Sims has refinanced Presbyterian Retirement Communities (PRC), dba Westminster Communities of Florida, to reduce overall cost of capital and annual debt service and increase debt capacity; utilize additional debt capacity to borrow new money without affecting credit rating; and to provide improvements to financial covenants, the company said.
The debt capacity generated by the asset base remains in excess of commitments and, following the scheduled amortisation at the beginning of October, available credit under the RBL is now $3.
But the presence in a scenario of subsidised borrowing, issue costs on new financing or an increase in debt capacity caused by a project are all signs that APV calculations are likely to be needed.
LSL Property Services has agreed a new PS100m banking facility from four banks to provide additional debt capacity, it has announced to the London Stock Exchange.
With our acquisitions last year our cash went down, but being a company that has very little debt our debt capacity is quite substantial," said chief executive officer Fadi Ghandour "If we do an acquisition over a certain size we will have to tap the debt market.
Requiring no capital or use of debt capacity from the IHE, the program is structured as an off-balance sheet transaction.
The attraction of this instrument is that it is similar to quasi-equity and thus enables companies to fund themselves while maintaining their debt capacity and strengthening their balance sheet.
In this paper we use UK data to present empirical evidence on the valuation and debt capacity effects of foreign currency (FC) and interest rate (IR) hedging.
The proceeds of the financing will be used to repay existing debt, to provide additional debt capacity for merger and acquisition activity and for general corporate purposes.
B also has additional debt capacity and distributes a dividend to A; simultaneously, A makes a loan to B, or alternatively, B distributes a note to A; see the exhibit on p.
The second tax incentive to hedge involves increasing debt capacity by reducing income volatility.