Data Mining

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Data Mining

The practice of looking for a pattern in a large amount of seemingly random data. Data mining is usually done with a computer program and helps in marketing. That is, a company can look at the (publicly available) purchase patterns of a person or group of persons and determine what products to direct at them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, we employ datamining as an alternative method to discover useful information from large volumes of data and to analyze real estate market behaviors.
12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), a division of the American Chemical Society and the world's authority for chemical information, today announced a long term collaboration with InfoChem, GmbH (InfoChem), a leader in chemical structure and reaction technology as well as datamining in chemical science documents, headquartered in Munich, Germany.
A History of the Development of Datamining in Pharmaceutical Research (David J.
Our blocking of other datamining sites is better for the casual player.
But most importantly, Goffe said it will enable ISVs that are building line of business applications, such as ERP, CRM or e- commerce systems, to embed the datamining technology into their actual applications.
Factors dominating their choice include: * How tightly coupled must Internet bill presentment be to legacy systems, including bill production, archiving systems, customer service, datamining applications, etc.
To properly analyze and use data, especially in a datamining scenario, a company must have the means to manage data and act upon the insights generated.
The 10th Direct-to-Consumer Marketing & Advertising Summit in Philadelphia on June 20-21 will feature three workshops, including one entitled "Consumer Datamining for Accelerated Database Creation, Effective Segmentation and Targeting," led by Consumer Health Sciences.
Papers are arranged in sections on software engineering; agents, datamining, and ontologies; artificial intelligence; bioinformatics; cognitive technologies; communication systems; computer vision, graphics, visualization, and image processing; advanced robotics; distributed and parallel computing; IT in education and health, and in national security; mobile computing; multimedia; security; signal processing; telecommunication and networking; and the internet and the world wide web.