Virtual Reality

(redirected from Data glove)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Virtual Reality

A computer simulation that takes data inputs and uses a stated methodology to create outputs. Virtual reality is used in gaming. Likewise, it is important in science and business to predict future trends.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the limitations of the user can be very good to make up for the shortcomings of the data glove input.
Virtual reality--application of data glove in the solution of selected tasks.
How it works: An active-tracking haptics system linking two PCs is used, with a virtual-reality data glove capturing the texture of an object being felt by one person.
Sensor-covered clothing and Data Gloves are cumbersome, and today's head-mounted displays are uncomfortable and it has been documented that it can cause vertigo.
The medical field reports that the data glove would have "advantages for patient motor therapy, rehabilitation and tele-rehabilitation post-surgical evaluation, tele-operations, estimation of functional assessment or disability.
Mark Schelbert, managing partner of Shackleton Advisors, added, "The data glove application for industrial engineering, motion capture, and gaming continues to be an underserved market.
The company has incorporated the Bend Sensors(R) into the Data Glove, which among its numerous uses, include interaction with personal computers, replacing a computer mouse, gaming, virtual reality projects, telerobotic applications, and motion capture tasks.
Summary: BeBop Sensors, a developer of smart fabric sensor technology, has announced BeBop Sensors that are designed Marcel Modular Data Gloves for OEMS in the virtual reality/augmented reality markets.
To acquire data for SLI, earlier data gloves and accelerometers were used to specify hand.
With data gloves, optical devices, head trackers and hand-held objects a user perceives to be in a virtual world.
Entries range from a hydrogel that pours drugs into wounds and intelligent data gloves for arthritis sufferers to pollution-eating inks and real-time route planners for in-transit travellers.
We needed a system that enabled natural 3D interactions with bare hands, but with as much flexibility and accuracy as data gloves.