Debt-to-Income Ratio

(redirected from DTI Ratios)

Debt-to-Income Ratio

The amount of an individual or company's gross income that it spends on debt service as a percentage of its total gross income. The higher the DTI is, the less likely it is that the individual or company will be able to repay debt. As a result, financial institutions use the DTI in informing decisions on whether or not to make loans. Often, the "debt" in the term refers to all liability payments (such as employee wages, taxes, and utility bills) and not simply to debt.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apply relaxed DTI ratios for those who temporarily owe two mortgages before the sales of old homes, the newly-married and young adults
After all, not all borrowers with DTI ratios of 44 and higher are created equal--and neither are all non-QM loans.
Younger families had much higher DTI ratios throughout the time series.
The government wants to see the newly adjusted LTV and DTI ratios help people borrow money with lower interest rates from financial institutions.
The DTI ratios reported here are the mean debt per credit record within a census tract, divided by the tract's per capita income.
Most important: Postpone your purchase until your DTI ratios tell you -- yes, you can afford the house you want and lenders won't reject you out of hand.
92) Although these results do not square exactly with other findings, it may be due to the lack of variation in DTI ratios in this particular sample.
Thus, analysts who believe that this type of unaffordability is at the heart of the crisis often support proposals designed to lower DTI ratios on a long-term basis.
Our program provides real estate professionals with another way to help their clients potentially sell their homes, which may have a mortgage amount that exceeds their home's value, or it may aid a prospective buyer that does not qualify to purchase due to some challenge such as short time on employment, or credit scores and DTI ratios that are not in line with what the bank may require, among other things," added Mr.
Recent college graduates, saddled with large student loan debt, will also have to postpone home purchases while getting their DTI ratios under the cap.
White and other non-disadvantaged young families typically had higher average DTI ratios than their disadvantaged counterparts in every year of the survey except 2007 (Emmons and Noeth, 2012b).