goldbricking

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Goldbricking

The appearance of working, when in fact one is surfing the Internet, making personal phone calls, or generally not working. A goldbricker tries to look busy but in fact is not very productive at all.

goldbricking

a hoarding of output by employees when PIECEWORK is in operation. Employees do not declare their full daily output, preferring to hide it and then declare it at a later date. Payment for it will thus be received in the future. This enables employees to regulate their earnings over time. On some days they can take it easy but by releasing previous output to management they can achieve their usual level of pay. See QUOTA RESTRICTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 76 articles, 14 were deemed unrelated to the specific issue of Cyberloafing and, thus the data analysis was based on 62 journal articles.
The results of this bibliometric exercise indicate that although the topic of cyberloafing is an emerging concern in practice, research efforts, to date, are somewhat focused on a rather narrow range of topics or issues (Table 1).
Advances in the understanding and management of cyberloafing would be more forthcoming when researchers focus investigatory efforts on salient issues like personality dynamics, individual differences factors, corporate culture, and organizational values (see Liberman et al.
While a few minutes of personal Web surfing now and then may seem harmless, given that about one-third of the world's countries participate in some form of daylight saving time, the researchers wrote that "global productivity losses from a spike in employee cyberloafing are potentially staggering.
The researchers said that employers can facilitate more self-regulation of their employees' cyberloafing if they encourage their employees to get a sufficient amount of sleep.
A study by Blanchard and Henle (2008) proposed the terms 'minor cyberloafing' and 'serious cyberloafing' and found that employees' perceptions of coworker and supervisor norms supporting cyberloafing are related to minor cyberloafing but not serious cyberloafing.
An additional study found that role stressors in organizations, including role ambiguity, role conflict, and role overload, had an impact on cyberloafing (Henle and Blanchard, 2008).
The Interaction of Work Stressors and Organizational Sanctions on Cyberloafing.
Previous research investigating cyberloafing is primarily descriptive (an exception is Lim, 2002).
It is important to empirically study cyberloafing because of its prevalence and detrimental consequences.
Although cyberloafing can have positive effects (e.
Cyberloafing costs employers $4,500 per year, per employee.