goldbricking

(redirected from Cyberloafing)
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Goldbricking

The appearance of working, when in fact one is surfing the Internet, making personal phone calls, or generally not working. A goldbricker tries to look busy but in fact is not very productive at all.

goldbricking

a hoarding of output by employees when PIECEWORK is in operation. Employees do not declare their full daily output, preferring to hide it and then declare it at a later date. Payment for it will thus be received in the future. This enables employees to regulate their earnings over time. On some days they can take it easy but by releasing previous output to management they can achieve their usual level of pay. See QUOTA RESTRICTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Employee job attitudes and organizational characteristics as predictors of cyberloafing.
Cyberloafing is a new term introduced by the emergence of cyber sciences and the World Wide Web in particular.
In another definition, cyberloafing means the deliberate usage of IT for nonbusiness affairs in the workplace and during defined working hours that do not need huge technological skills.
B y all accounts, the topic of cyberloafing has generated much research attention and remains an emerging issue across several academic disciplines (Griffiths, 2010).
Of the 76 articles, 14 were deemed unrelated to the specific issue of Cyberloafing and, thus the data analysis was based on 62 journal articles.
If these firms could crack down effectively on cyberloafing they could increase profits by 15pc.
4 minutes more of cyberloafing (or 20 percent of the assigned task time) for every hour of interrupted sleep the night before.
While a few minutes of personal Web surfing now and then may seem harmless, given that about one-third of the world's countries participate in some form of daylight saving time, the researchers wrote that "global productivity losses from a spike in employee cyberloafing are potentially staggering.
Early studies of cyberslacking and cyberloafing assumed that employee behavior was entirely negative and needed to be eliminated through some means.
Although employees have long found ways of shirking such as personal phone calls or trips to the water cooler, cyberloafing enables employees to avoid work duties using modern technology.
cyberloafing accounts for 30 percent to 40 percent of lost worker productivity today.
The study called 'Impact of Cyberloafing on Psychological Engagement' was presented at the annual meeting of the Academy of Management in San Antonio, Texas.