Cutoff point


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Cutoff point

The lowest rate of return acceptable on investments.

Cutoff Point

The required rate of return needed to make an investment worth the expense. The cutoff point is subject and varies from investor to investor. However, in general, cutoff points vary by risk. That is, the cutoff point is almost higher for a riskier investment, meaning that the investor will not invest in a risky venture that is unlikely to have a high rate of return. Some investors adopt cutoff points as their personal investment policies, while others decide based on the situation.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Yang et al have also reported an NC of greater than 39 cm for men and greater than 35 cm for women as the cutoff point that best correlates with subjects having metabolic syndrome.
As for participants with cognitive impairments, the results indicate that the absence of visual items dramatically decreased sensitivity values from 90% to 44% for MCI and from 100% to 87% for AD when the cutoff point was shifted by the absolute value of dropped items.
The cutoff points may also not be relevant for use with older adults who are experiencing both acute and chronic pain from multiple comorbid conditions.
5 to the mean, one arrives at the cutoff point for each subscale.
However, the GFR results fell below the cutoff point for moderate CKD in 16% of patients.
Supervisors Yvonne Brathwaite Burke and Zev Yaroslavsky asked Wolfe why the county must spend new money on nonessential Public Works projects when other pressing funding matters are at hand, such as the cutoff point this summer when a multibillion-dollar federal bailout of the county health system ends.
Cables are just two points adrift of the cutoff point, and the Valerie Park boss insisted: 'There is no reason why we can't earn a place in the play-offs.
Surely 22 weeks would seem a sensible cutoff point for both
34) the 85th percentile was taken as the cutoff point for overweight and the 95th for obesity.
That, in turn, requires either (a) identifying and defending a cutoff point other than conception, or (b) not identifying a cutoff point but directly attacking the argument's conclusion.
However, even with the poor or low achievement criterion, studies may not come up with identical sample, given a population, because there seems to be no agreed upon cutoff point to distinguish MD and NA children.