Cutoff point

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Cutoff point

The lowest rate of return acceptable on investments.

Cutoff Point

The required rate of return needed to make an investment worth the expense. The cutoff point is subject and varies from investor to investor. However, in general, cutoff points vary by risk. That is, the cutoff point is almost higher for a riskier investment, meaning that the investor will not invest in a risky venture that is unlikely to have a high rate of return. Some investors adopt cutoff points as their personal investment policies, while others decide based on the situation.
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In addition we examined the charts themselves as the they can shed some insight into the specific performance of the models at lower or higher cutoff points, a quality that has more utility in practice and thus likely to be used by financial institutions because loan granting institutions do not necessarily use models which perform best at a cutoff point equal to 0.
10) With fixed cutoff points, the actual phase-out rate would be defined differently according to circumstance.
When there are firms operating formally and the profit functions satisfy the following condition, there is a unique cutoff point in firm size:
With both cutoff points, the MoCAB's ability to identify normal participants as such increased from 87% to 98%.
The six-classification plan with new enrollment cutoff points should join the first draft in the trash bin.
The cutoff points may also not be relevant for use with older adults who are experiencing both acute and chronic pain from multiple comorbid conditions.
To achieve classification of the students' ego identity statuses, cutoff points for each of the four identity status subscales (IA, M, F, and D) were established, as described in Adams et al.
Practically, however, researchers employed cutoff points ranging from a low of 14th percentile (Ostad, 1997, 1999, 2000) to a high of 46th percentile (Geary, 1990).
Based on AHI cutoff points of 15, 20, and 30, changes in classification were seen in 6.
Because changing the cutoff points by even a mark or two caused large numbers of students to get a better or worse grade than they would have done the previous year, the proportion of candidates getting As could "inch up".
Recession" has specific meaning to economists; those folks have cutoff points for when we are or aren't in one.