Current dollar

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Current dollar

Refers to the use of actual or real prices and costs. Escalation or inflation effects are included.

Current Dollar

The value of a dollar at the time at which it is measured. This varies from year to year, and, in times of high inflation, it may vary more often. For example, the current dollar value of $10 in 1950 is different from the current dollar value of $10 in 2009. Comparing current dollars may help in determining the rate of inflation.
References in periodicals archive ?
where the second equality converts each series to current dollars.
It predicted that next year's level of commercial building will fall more than 40 percent below the 2007 peak when measured in current dollars.
United States Alaska United States Current Dollars 29,869 29,845 Current Dollars 39,934 38,564 Note: Table made from line graph.
Where tables rank leading arms suppliers to developing nations or leading developing nation recipients using four-year aggregate dollar totals, these values are expressed in current dollars.
Between 1965 and 1995, Korea's exports increased 400 times in current dollars.
In current dollars, they would buy $650 worth of salary by writing a check for $500," says Lendol Calder, a professor of history at Augustana College and author of the 1999 book Financing the American Dream: A Cultural History of Consumer Credit.
Real average weekly earnings are calculated by adjusting earnings in current dollars for changes in the CPI-W.
The builder of a 100-unit high-end residential building would save about $3 million in current dollars by purchasing 100 certificates for about $1.
To compute AIME, each year's earnings (up to the maximum social security income taxable for that year) are indexed by the cost-of-living factor for that year to inflate them to current dollars.
Wood also noted that current Dollars and Sense users will receive the same high level of technical support currently available to other Business Sense customers.
The annual indexes are based on industry output in terms of current dollars, defined as value added plus the cost of materials, reported in the Annual Survey of Manufactures; the current dollars are converted to constant dollars with deflators from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, which are based mostly on producer price indexes published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
But by 1984 the service was spending an average of $40 million in current dollars for the mere 322 aircraft acquired that year.