Crown


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Crown

A former coin in the United Kingdom equal in value to five shillings, or 1/4 of one British pound. The last crown was minted in 1965. Following decimalization in 1971, a 25-pence coin was minted to replace the crown. Informally, crowns were called dollars, recalling the time when one pound was worth four U.S. dollars.
References in classic literature ?
But when the time came to pay for his rosemary, this oil, and the wine, the only expense the master had incurred, as he had preserved a strict abstinence--while on the contrary, the yellow horse, by the account of the hostler at least, had eaten three times as much as a horse of his size could reasonably supposed to have done--D'Artagnan found nothing in his pocket but his little old velvet purse with the eleven crowns it contained; for as to the letter addressed to M.
Then take this glittering crown, hard and cold as your own heart will be, if you will shut out all that is bright and beautiful.
It is not good judgment to fit a crown of life upon a city which has been destroyed six times.
sir," said Gringoire, "I would that I could lend you some, but, my breeches are worn to holes, and 'tis not crowns which have done it.
But be not sad, for I shall give half these crowns to my old mother, and half will I add to the money which you may have, and so we shall buy that yellow cog wherein we sailed to Bordeaux, and in it we shall go forth and seek Sir Nigel.
dandelions, with whose golden blooms Walter had crowned her his queen of love and future bride--dandelions, the harbingers of spring, her sorrow's crown of sorrow--reminder of her happiest days.
This crown of the laughter, this rose-garland crown: to you my brethren do I cast this crown
Shtcherbatsky and Tchirikov, supporting the crowns and stumbling over the bride's train, smiling too and seeming delighted at something, were at one moment left behind, at the next treading on the bridal pair as the priest came to a halt.
He loved the guineas best, but he would not change the silver--the crowns and half-crowns that were his own earnings, begotten by his labour; he loved them all.
Here is a profane and drunken minstrel, called Allan-a-Dale nebulo quidam who has menaced me with corporal punishment nay, with death itself, an I pay not down four hundred crowns of ransom, to the boot of all the treasure he hath already robbed me of gold chains and gymmal rings to an unknown value; besides what is broken and spoiled among their rude hands, such as my pouncer-box and silver crisping-tongs.
By several other threats of the same kind they drew from us about six hundred crowns.
I untied the knot and I found forty Spanish gold crowns with a paper written in Arabic, and at the end of the writing there was a large cross drawn.