Cross-Training

(redirected from Crosstraining)
Also found in: Medical.

Cross-Training

The act or practice of training employees to perform multiple jobs if necessary. For example, a salesperson may train the office manager to make sales calls and the office manager may show the salesperson how to pay vendors. This way, if the salesperson goes on maternity leave or the office manager is fired, the company is able to function while a replacement is found.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kerry, 37, explains that she shed the pounds through yoga and crosstraining, and has vowed not to have any more children so she doesn't "ruin this body".
He highlights the benefits of crosstraining of workplace disciplines extended to cover any sector: "We ensure storage, network and server engineers collaborate more by pairing up.
If this is in fact what we are dealing with here, you must learn to scale back your training to more moderate levels and incorporate more low-impact crosstraining.
It frequently hosts crosstraining programmes, inviting national athletes to compete and train with members of the club.
Having that balance of crosstraining, for me, works.
POWER UP FOR BIG DAY Apart from time in the saddle, consider crosstraining, such as spin classes or swimming, ahead of Pedal for Scotland.
Keep a diary to track your progress in rehab and your crosstraining, like Pilates and swimming.
He's been doing crosstraining to keep some semblance of fitness so when it does come in it won't take him a month to get right because that would be Christmas.
We headed out for a run around the block before tackling a crosstraining circuit of core, cardio and strength exercises.
It's good crosstraining, (it's also good for) footwork, balancing," said Pacquiao in Filipino.
The Navy veteran took up dance as a form of crosstraining for the National Veterans Wheelchair Games (NVWG) about 11 years ago.
Treatment included pain management, range-of-motion exercises, trunk and lower extremity strengthening, balance and proprioception training, orthoses, crosstraining, and a guided return-to-dance progression.