design

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Related to Cross-sectional design: Longitudinal design

design

the process of translating a product idea into a product which can be produced and marketed on a commercial basis. Though design is a creative process it has economic consequences insofar as a product's shape, configuration and performance affect its marketability and its cost of production. In order to achieve high product variety without involving an excessive variety of components, designers often use common, interchangeable parts and design products on a modular basis.

In order to remain competitive, firms need continuously to review the design of their products in the light of new developments in materials and processes. The technique of VALUE ANALYSIS is used to identify possible sources of cost savings without impairing a product's performance. See COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN, NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT.

References in periodicals archive ?
The issues are cross-sectional design, comparison group, adult centric, sample size, standardized instrument, male caregivers, and the dilemma of quantitative vs.
A cross-sectional design was used to collect data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 15.
Cross-sectional design and convenience sampling had been selected for the above proposed study.
This potential limitation stems from the retrospective, cross-sectional design of the study, which limits investigating why patients were prescribed a certain regimen, for example.
The purpose of this controlled laboratory study using a cross-sectional design was to analyze lower extremity kinematics during takeoff of a "saut de chat" (leap) in dancers with and without a history of Achilles tendinopathy (AT).
Limitations include the cross-sectional design (which represents only a snapshot in time), reliance on self-reported exposures, potential selection bias, and uncontrolled confounding.
Although limited by the study's cross-sectional design, the current findings suggest that risk is acquired with residence in the United States.
A repeated cross-sectional design that excludes duplicates is not an appropriate design to use since it is impossible to identify a target population.
Most studies employed a cross-sectional design with one study being retrospective.
Other limitations, they add, are the cross-sectional design of the survey and the possible impact of social desirability bias.
Most research looking at personality profiles of martial artists used a cross-sectional design.
The research adopted a cross-sectional design, using a structured questionnaire.