Economic bubble

(redirected from Credit bubble)

Economic bubble

A market phenomenon characterized by surges in asset prices to levels significantly above the fundamental value of that asset. Bubbles are often hard to detect in real time because there is disagreement over the fundamental value of the asset.
References in periodicals archive ?
This compared with 12% of all customers and the group is demanding a clampdown amid fears of a potential credit bubble.
The Philippines will withstand a credit bubble as well as economic slowdown in China given relatively lower exports to the mainland compared with other countries in the region, according to the London-based economic research firm Capital Economics.
The catalyst has been Beijing's belated effort to bring an enormous credit bubble under control.
Regulator, Guo Shuqing, has said that authorities would step up measures to discipline the unruly financial system and rein in a huge credit bubble.
While Germany's external surplus, at 8% of GDP, is big --too big--it is not the result of currency manipulation by Germany The real culprits are an inflationary credit bubble in southern Europe, the expansionary policies of the European Central Bank, and the financial products US banks sold to the world.
This poses a credit bubble risk, caused by hefty lending to state- owned enterprises and local governments in China.
According to a recent McKinsey study, in the seven years since the bursting of a global credit bubble that resulted in the worst world financial crisis since the Great Depression, overall global debt has increased by around US$60 trillion, or by some 17 percentage points of global GDP.
There is no evidence of a credit bubble or excessive private sector leverage.
China's government is constrained by a credit bubble that has ballooned to $28tn in a $10tn-plus economy.
THE BIG SHORT (15) DIRECTOR Adam McKay draws inspiration from Michael Lewis' non-fiction account of the housing and credit bubble to dramatise the incredible true story of the men who made a killing by wagering against the US economy.
Stepping away from the dim-witted Will Ferrell comedies that have made his name, McKay draws inspiration from Michael Lewis' non-fiction account of the housing and credit bubble to dramatise the incredible true story of the men who made a killing by wagering against the US economy.