correlation

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Correlation

Statistical measure of the degree to which the movements of two variables (stock/option/convertible prices or returns) are related. See: Correlation coefficient.

correlation

The relationship between two variables during a period of time, especially one that shows a close match between the variables' movements. For example, all utility stocks tend to have a high degree of correlation because their share prices are influenced by the same forces. Conversely, gold stock price movements are not closely correlated with utility stock price movements because the two are influenced by very different factors. The concept of correlation is frequently used in portfolio analysis. See also serial correlation.

Correlation.

In investment terms, correlation is the extent to which the values of different types of investments move in tandem with one another in response to changing economic and market conditions.

Correlation is measured on a scale of - 1 to +1. Investments with a correlation of + 0.5 or more tend to rise and fall in value at the same time. Investments with a negative correlation of - 0.5 to - 1 are more likely to gain or lose value in opposing cycles.

correlation

a statistical term that describes the degree of association between two variables. When two variables tend to change together, then they are said to be correlated, and the extent to which they are correlated is measured by means of the CORRELATION COEFFICIENT.

correlation

A former appraisal term, replaced by reconciliation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lastly, to determine the strengths of the relationships between the variables and patient satisfaction, and, more importantly, to test the validity of the theory about causal relationships between three or more variables that have been studied using a correlational research design, we used a structural equation model (Path Analysis).
Our review resulted in the identification of several interventions that were designed to improve employability skills (such as job seeking, assertiveness, independent living, and self-constructs) that correlational research also found to be predictors of employment.
2009) conducted a review of correlational research in secondary transition to identify "evidence-based predictors" by determining what in-school programs, services, instruction, and policies were positively correlated with better post-school outcomes in education, employment, and independent living.
We used correlational research design and collected cross-sectional data for our purpose.
We emphasize that while correlational research can suggest possibilities for increasing father involvement, investments in rigorous experimental research of programmatic interventions are needed.
Despite their widespread use, many researchers view psychometrics and measurement as relevant only for the study of individual differences, correlational research, or for self-report scales.