Corporate Action

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Corporate Action

Any action a publicly-traded company takes that affects its shareholders and/or bondholders, whether positively or negatively. Common examples of corporate action include stock splits, where the company doubles the number of its shares, and calling bonds, where a company deprives bondholders of coupons to which they would otherwise have been entitled. Corporate actions must be approved by the board of directors and in many circumstances shareholders may vote on the measures as well.
References in periodicals archive ?
A few years and a corporate reorganization later, the stock is sold for $300 million.
A successful corporate reorganization depends as much on human interaction as it does on well-honed financial models or crisp legal arguments.
Victoria Aine O'Connor practices in complex federal tax audit and litigation matters and the federal taxation of domestic and international corporate reorganizations.
The office's core practices include: general corporate transactions including mergers & acquisitions, private equity transactions, corporate restructurings and joint ventures; commercial law including competition law matters, distribution and licensing; labor law, with a particular emphasis on large corporate reorganizations and litigation; tax including international taxation of companies and individuals, tax structuring of corporate transactions and investment funds, and personal tax planning; and commercial litigation including appearances before various French courts and international arbitration tribunals and acting as "instructing solicitor" in cases before courts and jurisdictions in which the firm is not admitted.
503 US 79 (1992), the court noted it is "well-established that expenses incurred for professional fees related to corporate reorganizations must be capitalized.
These transactions, in the fields of corporate finance, municipal finance, mergers & acquisitions, corporate reorganizations, and venture capital total several billion dollars in aggregate value.
he IRS has issued important final regulations that provide guidance on the satisfaction of the continuity of interest (COI) and continuity of business enterprise (COBE) requirements for corporate reorganizations.
Prior to his position at Kroll, Endicott was a consulting manager for Arthur Andersen LLP, handling valuations of various business assets related to mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, joint ventures, tax planning, corporate reorganizations and financial reporting.
23, 1998, the IRS issued final regulations on the satisfaction of the continuity-of-shareholder-interest (COSI) and continuity-of-business-enterprise (COBE) requirements for corporate reorganizations.

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