Cooperative


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Cooperative

An organization owned by its members. Examples are agriculture cooperatives that assist farmers in selling their products more efficiently and apartment buildings owned by the residents who have full control of the property.

Cooperative

Any organization owned by its members. A cooperative may be a business owned by its employees and/or customers, a residential complex owned by the people who live in it, or even a bank owned by its depositors. Certain legal requirements are incumbent upon cooperatives; for example, there is often a cap on how much of their profits may be distributed. See also: Cooperative economics.

Cooperative (co-op).

A co-op is a corporation that owns a particular residential property. The shareholders are the tenants who, instead of owning an individual unit, own shares in the corporation, which gives them the right to live in that unit.

cooperative

see WORKERS' COOPERATIVE, RETAIL COOPERATIVE.

cooperative

a form of business FIRM that is owned and run by a group of individuals for their mutual benefit. Examples of cooperatives include:
  1. worker or producer cooperatives: businesses that are owned and managed by their employees, who share in the net profit of the business.
  2. wholesale cooperatives: businesses whose membership comprises a multitude of small independent retailers. The prime objective of such a group is to use its combined BULK-BUYING power to obtain discounts and concessions from manufacturers, similar to those achieved by larger SUPERMARKET chains.
  3. retail cooperatives: businesses that are run in the interest of customers, who hold membership rights entitling them to receive an annual dividend or refund in proportion to their spending at the cooperative's shops.

See WHOLESALER, RETAILER, DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL.

References in periodicals archive ?
Current global conditions demand that economic viability be granted priority status in resolving problems associated with trans-national crime within the broader context of cooperative security.
Within three years, he was named the executive director of the Oklahoma Agricultural Cooperative Council, providing support and education to co-ops throughout the state and working closely with Farmland.
Yet, despite growing evidence that the national collection being amassed today is weaker than it was, and despite advances in many aspects of resource sharing, cooperative efforts in building collections have still been limited in their impact.
In 1992, she joined the board of the National Cooperative Business Association, where she served as chair from 20042006.
Dauby, Nick Dilger, Perry-Spencer Rural Telephone Co-op d/b/a PSC; Otto Richard Leis, Pulaski-White Rural Telephone Cooperative; Ervin Iceberg, SEI Communications (Southeastern Indiana Rural Telephone Co-op); Betty Thomas, Washington County Rural Telephone Cooperative
Luverne Crosser, Merlyn Wookey, Interstate Telecommunications Cooperative; William Ewalt, James Valley Cooperative Telephone Co.
In 1962, by virtue of Note 2, Article 165 of the Act on Land Reforms, the farmers who received agricultural land had to already register as a member of rural cooperative society.
Jenkins, Antil, & Vadasy (2003) investigated the perceptions of general education teachers towards the effectiveness of cooperative learning on special education students.
Working with cooperatives has been a career-long commitment, and I'm honored to join such a prestigious group of members in the Cooperative Hall of Fame," said Silver.
CDF is the administrator of the Cooperative Hall of Fame, which honors those distinguished individuals whose contributions to cooperative business have been genuinely heroic.
Co-ops are an economic model that includes ownership from more than one person," says Angela Dawson, communications director for Northcountry Cooperative Development Fund in Minneapolis.

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