Convention Expenses

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Convention Expenses

Expenses incurred when a person attends a business-related convention. For example, if a dentist travels to another location to attend an American Dental Association meeting, lodging, meals, and transportation costs usually count as convention expenses. One may deduct convention expenses from one's taxable income, provided they are, in fact, directly related to business. For this reason, convention expenses are somewhat controversial; some companies, for example, book a business meeting at a major resort and then deduct the entire cost. Whether or not this is an actual convention expense is a source of debate.

Convention Expenses

Travel expenses incurred in attending a convention are deductible if the meetings are related to a taxpayer's trade or business or job-related activities. If, however, the convention trip is primarily for pleasure or for investment purposes, no deduction for travel expenses is permitted. Limitations may apply to foreign convention expenses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the Company incurred higher convention expense as a result of a change in the qualifying period, new eligibility requirements and the decision to combine its domestic, national conventions into one for the year 2000.
An association generates 70 - 80 percent of its annual revenue for its operating budget through registration fees and other convention expenses.
Fees and Funds Administrators Convention Expenses, $4.
Out-of-town convention expenses can also be deducted, if unreimbursed.
If you serve as a Board Member much of your state convention expenses are reimbursed (now you are really ahead).
That means black groups end up shelling out millions of dollars in convention expenses that could be saved or used to train staff to bargain for the best deals.
Those, in particular, who have their membership and convention expenses paid by their newspaper or broadcast station, might want to make a personal donation to this great organization, and to its future.
The Canadian government's response to concerns of industry and association executives makes Canada the only country with a value-added tax to offer a GST rebate on accommodation and convention expenses, according to Canada's Federal Tourism Minister Tom Hockin.
Prior-year results did not include any significant convention expenses but did include approximately $2.
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