Blood Diamond

(redirected from Conflict diamonds)
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Related to Conflict diamonds: Blood diamond

Blood Diamond

A diamond used to finance a war or rebellion. Blood diamonds are most common in Africa, where diamonds are plentiful and where there a great deal of conflict has taken place in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Trade in blood diamonds is illegal. In 2003, the United Nations put in place the Kimberley Process to certify diamonds as legitimate. Blood diamonds are also called conflict diamonds.
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The whole issue of conflict diamonds is again becoming a high-profile public concern thanks to a new film from Warner Brothers studios, made by Ed Zwick and starring the Hollywood heart-throb Leonardo DiCaprio.
But it does raise the issue of conflict diamonds and shines light on the shocking use of child soldiers - we're told in the end credits there are still 200,000 in Africa.
Though this private legal system operates successfully in downstream markets, such as New York's 47th Street, Richman asserts that it remains to be seen whether the Kimberly Process--another of the industry's instruments of self-governance--substantially can reduce the conflict diamond trade.
But Carson Butler, spokesman for the World Diamond Council says producers and traders are urging Warner Brothers to present the story 'in the proper historical context so they can relate how conflict diamonds have improved since then.
The Lusaka Agreement (1994) between six African nations to enhance cross-border enforcement of wildlife law provides a potentially useful model, as does, in a slightly different context, various initiatives designed to exclude illegal products from international markets, including the Catch Documentation Scheme of the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR; for illegal fishing) (CCAMLR 1999), the Kimberley Process on conflict diamonds (Kimberley Process 2002), and the European Union's (EU) recent Forest Law Enforcement, Governance, and Trade action plan (on illegal logging) (EU 2003).
But a recent World Bank study suggests that if conflict diamonds can be outlawed, why not conflict gold and conflict coltan?
ECUSA worked in partnership with the Campaign to Eliminate Conflict Diamonds, a coalition of more than 150 organizations, to secure passage of the legislation.
Money from the sale of conflict diamonds has been used to support terrorist groups or dictatorial regimes.
But black marketeers have been cashing in on the demand by trafficking precious stones known as blood or conflict diamonds.
Trade in conflict diamonds is a matter of serious international concern, which can be directly linked to the fueling of armed conflict, the activities of rebel movements aimed at undermining or overthrowing legitimate governments, and the illicit traffic in, and proliferation of, armaments especially small arms and light weapons,'' the WTO said in a statement.
Overall, we are happy with the agreement," said Alex Yearsley, lead campaigner at Global Witness, the London-based NGO nominated for the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for its work on conflict diamonds.
The global effort to halt the market in conflict diamonds, for example, has had some success in reducing the bloodletting in West Africa.

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