Blood Diamond

(redirected from Conflict diamond)
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Blood Diamond

A diamond used to finance a war or rebellion. Blood diamonds are most common in Africa, where diamonds are plentiful and where there a great deal of conflict has taken place in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Trade in blood diamonds is illegal. In 2003, the United Nations put in place the Kimberley Process to certify diamonds as legitimate. Blood diamonds are also called conflict diamonds.
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However, due to the growing awareness of conflict diamonds and the travesties their acquisition has caused, some diamond retailers now provide a guarantee that their diamonds are conflict-free.
Clean Diamond Trade Act was signed into law to implement the Kimberly Process Certification Scheme and sever tie link between conflict diamonds and the U.
The new film has aroused another storm of controversy, not least because in February 2006, Kago G Moshashane, the deputy secretary of Botswana's Ministry of Minerals, Energy and Water Resources, and Eli Izhakoff, chairman of the World Diamond Council, sent a joint letter to Zwick asking the filmmaker to show how mine owners have acted against Sierra Leone's conflict diamond trade.
Warns Richman: "There is a real danger that this process that is intended to stop conflict diamonds can instead allow a monopolist like De Beers to strengthen its control over the global supply.
Many of these terrible conflicts have been financed by the selling of conflict diamonds.
22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- With the Oscar night ceremony drawing renewed attention to blood diamonds, a new survey by Amnesty International USA and Global Witness shows the $33 billion-a-year American jewelry retail industry is failing to take adequate measures to help consumers avoid conflict diamonds.
The Kimberley Process, launched in January 2003, is an international diamond certification system to eradicate the trade in conflict diamonds.
This small percentage is no cause for dismissal; the very existence of conflict diamonds is continued cause for global alarm.
RETAILERS aren't doing enough to prevent customers buying conflict diamonds, a new report says.
Anneke Galama of Fatal Transactions, a non-government group that lobbies for the fair distribution of profits from Afri-ca'snaturaresources, said the case also was a landmark in the fight against conflict diamonds.

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