block

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Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Acute or chronic demyelinating neuropathies may occur a few months after the institution of TNF-[alpha] treatment, very often associated with conduction blocks on nerve conduction studies.
Conduction block that recovers without development of increased temporal dispersion or other demyelinating features.
Performing epicardial ablation on a beating heart avoids cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross clamping associated with traditional procedures such as the cut and sew Maze, and allows for confirmation of conduction block.
Demyelinated fibers are sensitive to small changes in temperature and electrolytes, which can quickly produce conduction block.
Electromyography with needle conduction study is helpful in the diagnosis of AIDP, typically revealing slowing of nerve conduction with conduction block or abnormal dispersion, prolonged distal latencies, and delayed F waves (12).
Neurapraxis (nerve "shock") results simply in a conduction block along the neurite.
Transmurality of the lesions is required for conduction block which, in turn, is essential for the prevention of abnormal conduction associated with AF, and for the potential to restore normal heart rhythm.
Atrial flutter with alternating 2:1 and 4:1 conduction block c.
It is done by inserting special flexible tubes (catheters) with electrodes at the tip into various locations within the heart from leg and neck veins and creating a three-dimensional map (shell) of the left upper chamber and then creating a series of lesions set with electrical energy (radio frequency ablation) to create a conduction block to abnormal electrical impulses at various predetermined locations.
Radiofrequency energy was terminated immediately in the event of impedance rise, displacement of the catheter, an increase in PR interval, occurrence of AV conduction block, accelerated JR with cycle length shorter than 450 ms or JR without ventriculoatrial conduction.