Hacker

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Hacker

A person who infiltrates a computer system, usually in order to gather information. A hacker finds a way past the system's protocols. Some hackers do this simply for the thrill, though many others hack for nefarious purposes. For example, a hacker may be hired by a company or government to conduct espionage on a competitor or enemy. Other hackers freelance in order to find things like credit card numbers to facilitate identity theft and other crimes. However, the word is not always used in a negative context.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Independent reported Monday that computer hackers obtained credit card data of the world's top political and business leaders, including Microsoft Corp.
While computer hackers may have used or tampered access codes to spread the virus, Bautista said the intention of the computer hackers was not to defraud but to destroy files.
The raids inspired Taiwanese computer hackers to start a counter-offensive earlier this week posting Taiwan's national flag along with messages defying Beijing's claim to sovereignty over Taiwan on some official Chinese Web sites.
Enter the modern-day alchemist, the shadowy figure who makes us feel even stupider than we usually do, the diabolical master of an arcane discipline we barely understand: the malevolent computer hacker.
No matter what steps are taken, PBXs and voice mail systems can be victimized by computer hackers.
91 million records containing personal information have been involved in security breaches including lost backup tapes, stolen laptops and attacks by computer hackers since 2005, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
Summary: Computer hackers have targeted The Sun's website redirecting users to a hoax story on Rupert Murdoch's suicide.
Today's topic, "How to Protect Your Wireless Networks from Computer Hackers," will be moderated by Cyber Security Expert, Gregory D.
TWO suspected computer hackers have been arrested in Manchester by detectives investigating a sophisticated virus threatening the safety of the internet.
Some critics, however, fear that e-voting is not secure from computer hackers.
ENTREPRENEURS Tom Flockhart and Gordon Beattie have launched a business to protect Scots firms from computer hackers.
To some fans, the case confirms suspicions that insiders or computer hackers have been placing wagers during the running of races, fears brought to a head in the first race of Hollywood Park's spring-summer meet in April when a $118,000 wager from Maine belatedly dropped the winner's odds from 9-2 to 2-5.

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