competitor

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competitor

a business rival of a firm supplying a particular GOOD or SERVICE which offers buyers an identical or similar product. Where customers regard a rival's products as being close substitutes then the rival's marketing strategies are likely to have a significant effect on the firm's own market position. See COMPETITION, COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE, COMPETITIVE STRATEGY, PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION.

competitor

a business rival of a firm supplying a good or service that offers buyers an identical or similar product. See COMPETITION, COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE, COMPETITIVE STRATEGY, PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, a company that competes in the marketplace often may find it easier to develop the facts needed to establish entitlement to injunctive relief, allowing them to stop other competitors from continuing to use a patented technology without permission.
The BBB advertises it will review advertising of competitors in a timely manner and provide an online review.
2 SELECT THE RIGHT COMPARISON GROUP When benchmarking with other institutions on things like faculty salaries and endowments per student, institutions often use a set of peer or aspiration institutions, with little consideration given to whether these institutions are actually its competitors.
Their competitors launch major advertising campaigns against them, focusing on their program's lack of experience.
POMONA - Drag racing enthusiasts will tell you their sport was the first extreme sport, one in which competitors could race as fast as the laws of physics would allow.
Knowledge possessed by an organization helps in generating innovations, making changes to product and service offerings and outwitting competitors.
The design challenge facing the competitors is to create an innovative, state-of-the-art design that responds to the unique diversity of the city's architecture and urban landscape while meeting the technical performance standards for a New York City street light.
Even when armed with such information, opportunities for insurers to differentiate themselves from competitors are limited.
IP Landscape puts a company's inventions and patents in the context of their own business strategy and that of their competitors, helping to derive the maximum value from technology investments.
Analysis of one's competitors has long been a staple of firms' competitive preparation.