Cliff Effect


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Cliff Effect

In economics, the disproportionately positive or negative results of an action. For example, suppose a company takes on too much debt and a credit ratings agency downgrades its bond rating. This may increase the company's borrowing costs significantly, which in turn gives it less cash on hand to make coupon payments. This can lead to a further downgrade and the cycle continues. The cliff effect implies that relatively little separates a company from being seen as quite healthy to being seen as a poor investment.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the challenges to transmitting digital signals comes from what is commonly referred to as "the cliff effect," the narrow gap between customers receiving a quality digital signal, or no signal at all.
The nineteenth century economist Alfred Marshall observed that the cliff effect extends further over time as the price differentials become more known.
The Economy and Fiscal Cliff Effect on Holiday Shopping Source: SOASTA Inc.