Clayton Act


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Clayton Act

A 1914 American antitrust law that expanded and clarified the Sherman Act of 1890. The act prohibited price discrimination, mergers that substantially decrease competition, and other practices that the Sherman Act left for court interpretation. Significantly, the Clayton Act exempted unions and labor organizations from its provisions because the Sherman Act had been used to restrict the ability to strike.

Clayton Act

A 1914 federal antitrust law designed to promote competition by prohibiting or severely restricting practices such as the acquisition of competitors, price discrimination, secret rebates, and interlocking directorates.
References in periodicals archive ?
32) Where the Clayton Act directly states a tying arrangement is unlawful in its statutory language, (33) the Sherman Act does not, but regulates tying by analyzing the tie's effect on competition.
In short, the court determined that the character of treble damages under [section] 4 of the Clayton Act was not persuasive in determining the character of treble damages under civil RICO.
While Section 6 of the Clayton Act was a step in the right direction for farmer marketing associations, it fell short of providing necessary protection for a couple of reasons:
Instead of proceeding under the Clayton Act, the FCC maintains that its "jurisdiction under the Communications Act is sufficient to address all questions regarding the competitive effects of the proposed transfer.
of the Clayton Act makes it unlawful to engage in exclusive dealing for
There can be little doubt that such was the intent of Congress when it adopted section 3 of the Clayton Act specifically targeting tying arrangements.
This article explores what FDUTPA adds to civil antitrust enforcement for Florida plaintiffs beyond the coverages of, and remedies available under, the other federal antitrust statutes (Sherman Act, Clayton Act, and amendments) and the Florida Antitrust Act (FAA).
The Robinson-Patman Act traces its history to 1914 when a section of the Clayton Act, which would evolve into the Federal Trade Commission Act, became the first federal statute prohibiting certain forms of price discrimination.
The Clayton Act of 1914 focuses specifically on situations in which two competitors in the same field of supply merge.
Laws addressed in this course include the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Clayton Act, The Robinson-Patman Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act.
Due to alleged abuses in these early mergers, Washington passed the Sherman Act (1890) and the Clayton Act (1914) and created the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in 1914.