Clayton Act


Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia.

Clayton Act

A 1914 American antitrust law that expanded and clarified the Sherman Act of 1890. The act prohibited price discrimination, mergers that substantially decrease competition, and other practices that the Sherman Act left for court interpretation. Significantly, the Clayton Act exempted unions and labor organizations from its provisions because the Sherman Act had been used to restrict the ability to strike.

Clayton Act

A 1914 federal antitrust law designed to promote competition by prohibiting or severely restricting practices such as the acquisition of competitors, price discrimination, secret rebates, and interlocking directorates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Section 6 of the Clayton Act provides that the "operation" of the cooperative is not forbidden by the antitrust laws, but it leaves exactly what that means open to question.
Section 16 of the Clayton Act empowers any person threatened with loss or damage by a violation of the Sherman or Clayton Acts to seek injunctive relief in the federal courts.
I believe that it is correct as a matter of law to interpret the Clayton Act to recognize two types of efficiency-defenses.
The absence of positive prices thus does not foreclose antitrust scrutiny; "trade," for purposes of the Sherman and Clayton Acts, encompasses zero-price transactions.
Unlike the Clayton Act, the PCA does not contain any specific provision expressly prohibiting interlocking directorates in competing businesses.
interlocking directorates under section 8 of the Clayton Act should be
In order to verify that the Clayton Act was in fact responsible for these changes, the authors perform the same empirical analysis on industrial firms, which were not subject to the law.
Section 6 of the Clayton Act, (6) the Capper-Volstead Act, (7) and the Cooperative Marketing Act of 1926 (8) provide, in combination, an antitrust exemption for some activities of farm cooperatives engaged in the marketing of agricultural commodities.
22) Courts utilize two Congressional acts to deal with tying: the Sherman Act of 189023 and the Clayton Act of 1914.
163) Appropriately, the defendant analogized RICO treble damages to the treble damages recoverable under [section] 4 of the Clayton Act, which served as RICO's model.
Frank Milliken, then president of Kennecott, learned the hard way in 1970 a term used by the FTC when reviewing a potential complaint charging that the merger had violated Section 7 of the Clayton Act.
According to the FTC's complaint, Novartis' acquisition of Fougera would violate a section of the Clayton Act by reducing competition in the generic drug markets for three skin care drugs: calcipotriene topical solution, lidocaine-prilocaine cream and metronidazole topical gel.