Civil Society

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Civil Society

A collection of persons who associate together to explore or promote their interests or goals. While civil society is not necessarily political or economic, it provides a sphere outside of the state or private sector in which people are motivated by their own goals, apart from profit or the good of the state. For that reason, civil society can exercise significant political influence. The growth of civil society is considered a mark of successful economic development of a country or region.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 11th Annual Report on Arab Civil Societies was launched at the headquarters of the Amel Association in Beirut.
The Lebanon report identified the dangers to society that local civil societies warn against, with unemployment topping the list, followed by drug use and sectarianism.
While the editor may not have intended to emphasize linkages with global civil society as one of the book's analytical themes, the study of civil societies in Asia will not be complete without understanding their myriad (and no doubt at times contentious) connections to the amorphous global civil society in such areas as the environment, equal rights, HIV/AIDS, and fair trade.
This would help further our understanding of the institutionalization of civil societies in Asia beyond the political change framework.
Practically, there is not one but many civil societies, yet denominational organisations are beginning to dominate.
Its organizations have provided models for other civil societies.
Adopted in November 1995, the Barcelona Euro-Mediterranean Declaration regards co-operation between civil societies as a cornerstone of relations between the two sides of the Mediterranean sea.
Most important, for purposes of analyzing ANGOHRs' differing attitudes toward external actors, are their founders' and leaders' evaluation and understanding of civil societies.
Their conceptions of civil society may vary, but such intellectuals clearly recognize the distinction of external civil societies and the state, and aim at distinguishing their own civil societies from their states.
Their assessment of the functioning of civil societies was therefore not conducive to extensive relations with external institutions.
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