Federal Cigarette Labeling & Advertising Act

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Federal Cigarette Labeling & Advertising Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1967, that required packs of cigarettes to carry warnings advising of their harmful effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
48) Significantly, the Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act expressly
In addition to the Compact Clause, CEI says, the MSA violates federal antitrust law, bankruptcy law (by giving the states privileged status as creditors), the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act (by regulating cigarette advertising and promotion, an area the law reserves to Congress), and the First Amendment (by restricting advertising and lobbying).
This was followed by the passage of the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act in 1965, which required warning labels to be placed on cigarette packages.
The Federal Trade Commission requires that bidi importers submit a plan detailing how they are going to comply with the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act by labeling their packs and cartons with one of the four standard Surgeon General's warnings before the cigarettes can be imported into the United States.
Report to Congress, pursuant to the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act.
1965: Passage of the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act, which requires the surgeon general's warnings on cigarette packs.
In a 41 - page opinion, the unanimous appeals panel ruled that United States Supreme Court decisions interpreting the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act bar ".
Christine Gregoire on March 9, violated the First Amendment and is preempted by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act (FCLAA), the federal law that generally bars states from regulating cigarette advertising and promotion.
The Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act prohibits cigarette advertising on television.
In addition, the company expects to challenge Judge Byron's ruling on a number of legal and factual grounds, including the fact that the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act sets forth the precise warning that must be printed on each package of cigarettes sold in the United States, and in advertisements for those cigarettes.
Gregoire on March 9, violates the First Amendment and is preempted by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act, the federal law that bars states from regulating cigarette advertising and promotion.
PM USA argued that the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act specifies the warnings on cigarette packaging and advertisements in the United States.